Tobacco Insect Scouting Report, September 4 2015

— Written By Jeremy Slone and last updated by
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Parasitized aphid mummies. Photo: Jeremy Slone

Parasitized aphid mummies. Photo: Jeremy Slone

This week was busy with the final primings at nearly all of our remaining sites. We will continue reporting our observations at Piedmont 2 until harvesting is complete. Although we didn’t see any worms at that site, we did see aphid infested plants at one of our on-farm sites for the first time this season. We record the percentage of parasitized aphids, and on both plants we did see a fair amount of parasitism. Parasitized aphids, pictured above, have a bloated appearance and will look white or light brown rather than red or green. The red color form is most common during hot NC summers. Regardless of color, aphids are most often found on suckers or the underside of upper leaves. Flea beetles are also still present, but at low populations in both fields. Even with beetles in the field, most plants continue to have a low rating for flea beetle damage.

Piedmont 2

Scouting Report, Piedmont 2 – Grower Standard Field

Insect observation No. aphid infested plants Flea beetles  per plant Percent tobacco budworm infested plants Hornworms per plant Percent cutworm damaged plants Other insects
Treatment needed? 0 – No treatment 1.96 flea beetles/plant– No treatment 0% infested – No treatment 0% – No treatment 0 – No treatment  

Scouting Report, Piedmont 2 – IPM Field

Insect observation No. aphid infested plants Flea beetles  per plant Percent tobacco budworm infested plants Hornworms per plant Percent cutworm damaged plants Other insects
Treatment needed? 2 – No treatment 2.56 flea beetles/plant– No treatment 0% infested – No treatment  0%  – No treatment 0 – No treatment  

More information

Tobacco insect scouting methods – Tobacco Growers Information Portal

Previous scouting reports – Tobacco pest information