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GAP Cover

The U.S. Tobacco GAP
Program

In 2013, the United States Tobacco Industry initiated the U.S. Tobacco Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) Program. At present, the U.S. Tobacco GAP Program is organized and housed by GAP Connections, Inc. in Knoxville, Tennessee. A brief description of the US Tobacco GAP Program from the GAP Connections website is below. "The U.S. Tobacco GAP Program was developed over several months with industry collaboration consisting of tobacco manufacturers dealers, state departments of agriculture, universities, grower associations, and other farm organizations such as Farm Bureau from across the tobacco growing regions. It is an industry-wide program that aims at ensuring sustainable, economically viable production of useable tobacco and can be defined as: agricultural practices which produce a quality crop wile protecting, sustaining or enhancing the environment with regard to soil, water, air, animal and plant life as well as protecting and ensuring the rights of farm laborers." Ultimately, the U.S. Tobacco GAP Program seeks to ensure that U.S. tobacco is produced in a manner that is competitive, sustainable, compliant, and safe for all involved parties. To promote compliance, tobacco producers are trained on the Principles of GAP at annual certification events conducted by the respective Cooperative Extension Services of the tobacco producing states.  In addition, the United States Department of Labor provides training and handouts for the Labor component of the program. In 2014, over 9,700 growers from 19 states were trained on the Principles of Tobacco GAP by land-grant Extension programs. The U.S. Tobacco GAP Program is still evolving and it is predicted that in the coming seasons producers will have access to a variety of electronic record keeping software and possibly more training options. In 2014, GAP Connections piloted unified industry audits and given the success of that program will continue in 2015 to expand the unified audit program, auditing roughly 700-800 growers across the tobacco growing states. In general, the U.S. Tobacco GAP program is an industry program not a governmental program and addresses concerns in crop production and agrochemical management like many other GAP programs but does not have the same focus on foodborne illnesses and sanitation as in fruit and vegetable  GAP programs.  In comparison, there is also additional focus on environmental and labor management practices which do not appear in many of the traditional GAP programs. While there are similarities between many GAP programs compliance within the U.S. Tobacco GAP does not mean compliance with any other GAP program. For additional information, contact your local Cooperative Extension Office.

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GAP Cover

The U.S. Tobacco GAP
Program

In 2013, the United States Tobacco Industry initiated the U.S. Tobacco Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) Program. At present, the U.S. Tobacco GAP Program is organized and housed by GAP Connections, Inc. in Knoxville, Tennessee. A brief description of the US Tobacco GAP Program from the GAP Connections website is below. "The U.S. Tobacco GAP Program was developed over several months with industry collaboration consisting of tobacco manufacturers dealers, state departments of agriculture, universities, grower associations, and other farm organizations such as Farm Bureau from across the tobacco growing regions. It is an industry-wide program that aims at ensuring sustainable, economically viable production of useable tobacco and can be defined as: agricultural practices which produce a quality crop wile protecting, sustaining or enhancing the environment with regard to soil, water, air, animal and plant life as well as protecting and ensuring the rights of farm laborers." Ultimately, the U.S. Tobacco GAP Program seeks to ensure that U.S. tobacco is produced in a manner that is competitive, sustainable, compliant, and safe for all involved parties. To promote compliance, tobacco producers are trained on the Principles of GAP at annual certification events conducted by the respective Cooperative Extension Services of the tobacco producing states.  In addition, the United States Department of Labor provides training and handouts for the Labor component of the program. In 2014, over 9,700 growers from 19 states were trained on the Principles of Tobacco GAP by land-grant Extension programs. The U.S. Tobacco GAP Program is still evolving and it is predicted that in the coming seasons producers will have access to a variety of electronic record keeping software and possibly more training options. In 2014, GAP Connections piloted unified industry audits and given the success of that program will continue in 2015 to expand the unified audit program, auditing roughly 700-800 growers across the tobacco growing states. In general, the U.S. Tobacco GAP program is an industry program not a governmental program and addresses concerns in crop production and agrochemical management like many other GAP programs but does not have the same focus on foodborne illnesses and sanitation as in fruit and vegetable  GAP programs.  In comparison, there is also additional focus on environmental and labor management practices which do not appear in many of the traditional GAP programs. While there are similarities between many GAP programs compliance within the U.S. Tobacco GAP does not mean compliance with any other GAP program. For additional information, contact your local Cooperative Extension Office.

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Adult tobacco thrips.  Photo: R. McPherson, www.bugwood.org

Tobacco Disease
Information Notes

You can find a wide variety of disease information notes on the Plant Disease & Insect Clinic's web site.

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Tobacco plant in field

Tobacco by the
Numbers

Tobacco has always been an important part of NC's economy.  NC continues to rank #1 in the production of tobacco.  Employment relating to tobaccon in NC is 255,000 and the total economic impact is over $7.0 billion. Find out more at the NCDA&CS Marketing site.

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Figure 2. The symptoms of sulfur deficiency can be seen moving up the plant from the center foliage. This may help one in distinguishing between sulfur deficiency and nitrogen deficiency, which occurs first on the lower foliage.
©2016 Forensic Floriculture

From the Field-Agronomy Notes popular

Tobacco Research Update: Sulfur Deficiency of Tobacco In this tobacco research update, we highlight the symptoms of sulfur deficiency.  These images are part of a project supported by the North Carolina Tobacco Foundation to MORE »

Figure 3. Intermediate K deficiency, note the marginal necrotic spots and advancing interveinal chlorosis.
©2016 Forensic Floriculture

From the Field-Agronomy Notes popular

Tobacco Research Update: Potassium Deficiency of Tobacco In this tobacco research update, we highlight the symptoms of potassium deficiency.  These images are part of a project supported by the North Carolina Tobacco Foundation to MORE »

Figure 3. Necrotic spotting that occurs on the foliage of tobacco is a more intermediate to severe symptom of P deficiency.
©2016 Forensic Floriculture

From the Field-Agronomy Notes popular

Tobacco Research Update: Phosphorus Deficiency of Tobacco In this tobacco research update, we highlight the symptoms of phosphorus deficiency.  These images are part of a project supported by the North Carolina Tobacco Foundation to MORE »

Figure 4. These symptoms of pale green coloration of the upper leaves, and severe yellowing and beaching of the lower leaves may be observed by downloading the above .gif file. This image provides a 360-degree view of a symptomatic plant.
©2016 Forensic Floriculture

From the Field-Agronomy Notes popular

Tobacco Research Update: Nitrogen Deficiency of Tobacco In this tobacco research update, we highlight the symptoms of nitrogen deficiency.  These images are part of a project supported by the North Carolina Tobacco Foundation to MORE »

Figure 2. View of a newly transplanted burley tobacco plant in the nutrient disorder irrigation system.  Note the yellow drip emitters used to deliver the nutrient solution.
©2016 Forensic Floriculture

From the Field-Agronomy Notes popular

Tobacco Research Update: Development of an Online Nutrient Disorder Diagnostic Key for Tobacco Over the next few weeks, we will be providing updates about our current research project of developing a web-based nutrient MORE »

This is not a tobacco budworm. Photo: Hannah Burrack

Corn earworm abundant early in tobacco

Our laboratory is beginning a project to determine the baseline susceptibility of tobacco-feeding tobacco budworm (Heliothis virescens) populations throughout the southeast to chlorantraniliprole, the active ingredient in the insecticides Coragen, Prevathon, Besiege, Voliam MORE » – from   Entomology

Young, early instar, hornworm larva. Photo: Jeremy Slone

Video guide to tobacco insect scouting

Graduate student Jeremy Slone is an expert in tobacco insect scouting methods, having recently defended his masters thesis, “Overcoming barriers to IPM adoption in flue cured tobacco“. To help growers and other visualize MORE »

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