Tobacco Insect Scouting Report, May 8, 2015

— Written By Jeremy Slone and last updated by
en Español

El inglés es el idioma de control de esta página. En la medida en que haya algún conflicto entre la traducción al inglés y la traducción, el inglés prevalece.

Al hacer clic en el enlace de traducción se activa un servicio de traducción gratuito para convertir la página al español. Al igual que con cualquier traducción por Internet, la conversión no es sensible al contexto y puede que no traduzca el texto en su significado original. NC State Extension no garantiza la exactitud del texto traducido. Por favor, tenga en cuenta que algunas aplicaciones y/o servicios pueden no funcionar como se espera cuando se traducen.

English is the controlling language of this page. To the extent there is any conflict between the English text and the translation, English controls.

Clicking on the translation link activates a free translation service to convert the page to Spanish. As with any Internet translation, the conversion is not context-sensitive and may not translate the text to its original meaning. NC State Extension does not guarantee the accuracy of the translated text. Please note that some applications and/or services may not function as expected when translated.

Collapse ▲
tobacco transplants in the greenhouse

Tobacco Transplants in the greenhouse

We’ve begun scouting in some our sites for this field season! It’s warming up outside and we are excited to get back in the field and share our scouting reports from around the state. This year we will have three sites in the eastern portion of the state and three sites from the Piedmont area. This week we visited two sites in Eastern NC, but starting next week we will be visiting all of the fields that are part of the scouting project this summer.

This year, will again be comparing grower standard management practices to management based on insect scouting. The goal of this project is to improve our scouting recommendations and make them easier for more growers to use. For more about the project, see our first scouting report from last year. Details about the scouting methods we use.

So far we have only seen flea beetles and some alate “winged” aphids, but most of the insects we observed were actually dead. This suggests that the greenhouse treatments are proving effective even though pest pressure is generally low this soon after transplant. These alate aphids are able to disperse into the field from much greater distances and are the first aphid colonizers in the field. Tobacco flea beetles overwinter in the soil and begin to emerge in the field as the weather becomes more favorable.

Scouting Report, Eastern 1 – Grower Standard Field

Insect observation No. aphid infested plants Flea beetles  per plant Percent tobacco budworm infested plants Hornworms per plant Percent cutworm damaged plants Other insects
Treatment needed? 0 – No treatment 0.3 flea beetles/plant– No treatment 0% budworm infested plants – No treatment 0 – No treatment 0 – No treatment

Scouting Report, Eastern 1 – IPM Field

Insect observation No. aphid infested plants Flea beetles  per plant Percent tobacco budworm infested plants Hornworms per plant Percent cutworm damaged plants Other insects
Treatment needed? 0 – No treatment 0 flea beetles/plant– No treatment 0% budworm infested plants – No treatment 0 – No treatment 0 – No treatment

Scouting Report, Eastern 2 – Grower Standard Field

Insect observation No. aphid infested plants Flea beetles  per plant Percent tobacco budworm infested plants Hornworms per plant Percent cutworm damaged plants Other insects
Treatment needed? 0 – No treatment 0 flea beetles/plant– No treatment 0% budworm infested plants – No treatment 0 – No treatment 0 – No treatment

Scouting Report, Eastern 2 – IPM Field

Insect observation No. aphid infested plants Flea beetles  per plant Percent tobacco budworm infested plants Hornworms per plant Percent cutworm damaged plants Other insects
Treatment needed? 0 – No treatment 0.1 flea beetles/plant– No treatment 0% budworm infested plants – No treatment 0 – No treatment 0 – No treatment

Check back next week to see information from all the sites we will be visiting this season.

More information

Tobacco insect scouting methods – Tobacco Growers Information Portal

Previous scouting reportsTobacco Growers Information Portal